Social Studies Courses

 

CGU1100/CHR1100     PARTICIPATION IN DEMOCRACY/MODERN HISTORY OF HAWAII     REQUIRED     YEAR PAIR

This pair of courses is required for all students in grade 11 who have not previously met this or similar requirements in other states.

 

CGU2200     AMERICAN PROBLEMS     SEMESTER

In this course, students use the tools and methodology of the political scientist, the economist, and the sociologist or anthropologist to investigate current social, political, and economic issues in contemporary America.

 

CGU2300     POLITICAL SCIENCE / GOVERNMENT     SEMESTER

This course synthesizes the concepts of governance, power, and authority, the concepts of our political party system, the ideals of American constitutional government, and the role of the United States in international politics, policies, and relations. It provides opportunities for students to engage in civic actions and to develop and support positions on political and social issues. The students actively use the tools and methodology of the political scientist to gather, interpret, and analyze data and to use this information to make decisions.

 

CGW2400     GLOBAL STUDIES     SEMESTER

This course examines, from a global perspective, contemporary economic, geo-political, and social issues in the global community.  It also looks at the historic forces of global encounters and exchanges that affected, changed, and shaped the modern global world. Five global concepts that are basic to global studies are the lenses through which information can be examined. The global concepts are: interdependence; images and perceptions (related to prejudice, stereotypes, and bias); social justice (fairness and human rights); conflict and conflict resolution, and change and the future. Active engagement is expected of students.

 

CHU1100     U.S. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT     REQUIRED     YEAR

This course examines the development of the United States through historical concepts of change, continuity, and causality; through civics concepts of governance, democracy, conflict, and cooperation; through geographical and anthropological concepts of diversity and unity of human/cultural systems; and through the economic concepts of interdependence, limited resources, and functions of markets. It requires students to judge the past on its own terms, not by present day or current standards, to understand people in the context of their times, and to understand that standards and ideas are constantly changing. This course allows students to examine key ideas, events, people, and movements in the United States, assisting them in developing their own personal, national, and world views necessary to make informed decisions. Students will use the tools and methodologies of the appropriate social scientists to conduct their inquiries.

 

CHW1100     WORLD HISTORY AND CULTURE     REQUIRED     YEAR

This course examines the development and dynamics of human experience through such themes as migration, imperialism, trade, exchanges, and transfers. This course provides a foundation and a rationale for active participation in our global community. It examines diverse perspectives, encourages diverse interpretations and historical empathy, and explores global conflict and cooperation. This course engages students in historical inquiry focusing on the historic, technologic, socio-political, geographic, and economic development of past and contemporary civilizations. Students examine decisions, events, and ideas of the past to make informed judgments on contemporary issues, decisions, and events.

 

CSA2000     ADVANCED PLACEMENT [AP™] HUMAN GEOGRAPHY     YEAR

This course emphasizes the importance of geography as a field of inquiry and briefly discusses the emergence of academic geography in nineteenth-century Europe. It shows how the discipline has evolved into the study of diverse peoples and areas organized around a set of concepts.  The discussion of the evolution of the discipline helps students understand how human geography is related to the rest of the field.  Geographic concepts embedded in this course are (among others) location, space, place, and scale. The study of spatial interaction and spatial behavior, the dynamics of human population growth and movement, patterns of culture, economic use of earth, political organization of space, and human settlement patterns will be examined.

This course is recommended for grade 9 and 10 students who wish to pursue rigorous coursework and who plan to apply to a 4-year college after graduation.  It also fulfills the requirements for seniors who have not already earned 4 Social Studies credits.  Prerequisite: Teacher Approval

 

CSD2500     ECONOMICS     SEMESTER

This course is recommended for all seniors who have not previously completed the 4 required credits in Social Studies, plan to attend a 4-year college or university and who do not plan to take an AP course, instead.